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Allison Paschke Tension-Filled Interchange

Allison Paschke

Show dates: December 20, 2012 – January 31, 2013

Artist’s reception: Thursday, January 3rd, 5:30 – 7:30pm

Pinfield Tiny Silver

Pinfield Tiny Silver, 2010 - Epoxy, resin, inks, acrylic gels, insect pins, mirror 9 x 9 x 2.5 inches.

Arches

Arches 2012 - Epoxy resin, acrylic gels, gouache, inks on mirror, 12.5 x 19.5 x 2.5 inches

Blue Strata: missing letters on the edge

Blue Strata 2009-Epoxy resin, inks, insect pins, gold leaf 19 x 12 x 2 inches

Gold and White Vessel: Window

Gold and White Vessel: Window 2012 - Epoxy resin, acrylic gels, gouache, inks on mirror, 48 x 48 inches

Gold and White Vessel: Sine

Gold and White Vessel: Sine 2012 - Epoxy resin, acrylic gels, gouache, inks on mirror, 36 X 48 inches

Gold and White Vessel: Double Parabola

Gold and White Vessel: Double Parabola 2012 - Epoxy resin, acrylic gels, gouache, inks on mirror, 24 x 48 inches

Cairo 2008 - Porcelain, tissue papers, epoxy resin, gouache, inks, plexi, mirror 6 x 4 x 4 inches

Light Box

Light Box 2002 - Epoxy, Resin, mirror, 10 x 10 x 3 inches.

Gold and White Portal

Gold and White Portal 2011 - Epoxy resin, acrylic gels, gouache, inks on mirror, 9 x 9 x .75inches.

Toomey Tourell Fine Art is pleased to announce an exhibition of sculptures and mixed media objects by Rhode Island based artist Allison Paschke.

The words that come to mind when looking at Paschke’s sculptural works usually describes light — reflected, filtered, scattered, glowing or refracted. The materiality of her sculptures distinguishes them from the tradition of Los Angeles “Light and Space” artists such as James Turrell, who use light as both subject and medium. Paschke captures light in translucent porcelain and epoxy resin, which provide an ephemeral quality that belies the sculpture’s permanence.

Paschke’s current work engages the viewer in a tension-filled interchange. Her objects are intended to change as the viewer moves past, peers into them, catches reflections and distortions, and is confined by intricate details. Each piece “creates a place for the mind”.

“All of my work is interactive”, says Paschke. “Sometimes movement through space and light affects the piece; sometimes the interaction is directly physical. I am looking for a present tense engagement, not a remote contemplation”.

In Object vs. Place, altered mirrors create distortions and become tiny worlds. In Geometry vs. Imperfection the attraction is in the simplicity that is made complex, through translucent layers and geometric perfection. In Subtlety vs. Intensity, shifts in texture become significant, in the context of monochromatic resins.

Contrast in scale between vast empty areas in small works vs. highly detailed sections of large works- two vs. three dimensionality and fragility vs. immortality define this exhibition. In the artist’s words: “The ephemeral is especially beautiful to me — the passing of light and the delicate and fragile. Trying to capture these things is a futile bid for immortality.”

Paschke’s work is in public and private collections including the Kansas City Art Institute, Blue/Cross Blue Shield and DMB&B. This is Allison Paschke’s second exhibition with Toomey Tourell.

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